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  5. 20 Immunity Boosting Foods You Need In Your Diet Today

The virus has certainly taught us all a lesson about the importance of immunity. Falling ill isn’t a risk you want to take these days. But unfortunately, you cannot build immunity overnight.

A consistent diet with immunity boosting foods, good sleep and exercise will strengthen your body in the long run to fight diseases. So here’s a comprehensive list of immune boosting foods you can add to your diet right away.

The Best Immunity Boosting Foods

1. Spinach

Leafy greens like spinach are low in calories and loaded with cold-busting zinc, anti-oxidants and oodles of Vitamin A.

What it does:

Spinach provides protection from eye damage, boosts immunity, treats acne, strengthens bones, aids in digestion, helps the heart and promotes weight loss.

Daily recommended dose:

You can eat up to two cups of dark, leafy greens each day.

How to eat:

Blend spinach into your favorite smoothie, or mix in baby spinach with other greens, citrus fruits and nuts in a salad. Lightly wilted or slightly boiled spinach is perfect with eggs on toast. Stir fry spinach with other veggies for a crunchy bite or add them into dal for a delicious tasting curry with rice or roti.

SkinKraft Tip:

Eat spinach raw or cook it as little as possible to get the most nutrients out of it.

Who it’s good for:

Vitamin A is especially good for pregnant women as it boosts the baby’s immune system as well.

Who should stay away:

Spinach might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin and might decrease blood sugar. So keep an eye out. It’s also a leafy green, very rich in calcium, potassium and iron. Those with chronic kidney diseases should not consume spinach.

Overconsumption of spinach can result in high oxalate levels, which creates an increased risk of joint problems and kidney stones. Oxalates are not recommended for individuals who have inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, gout, etc.

2. Carrots

Apart from the beta-carotene which gives carrots their orange shade, this sweet and crunchy immunity boosting food is full of immune system regulating and infection-fighting Vitamin A and carotenoids. Vitamin A helps keep your intestines and the tissues in your respiratory system, stomach and mouth strong and healthy.

What it does:

Carrots boost eye health (especially night vision), help in digestion and ensure bowel regularity. They also boost heart health and cholesterol, lower blood pressure, improve the health of your skin and last but not least, boost immunity.

Daily recommended dose:

Pile this food onto your plate at least a couple of times in a week. Three carrots every other day is fine.

Carrots are high in fiber. 25 grams of fiber per day on a 2,000-calorie diet for adults is what’s recommended.

Did You Know?

  • If you consume too many foods rich in beta-carotene, you can develop a harmless, treatable condition called carotenemia. Carotenemia is when your skin turns into an orangey color. [1]

How to eat:

Beta-carotene is not a heat-sensitive nutrient, so you can eat carrots slightly cooked without destroying its nutrition. Include a steamy side, a portion roasted to perfection, as a smoothie, in a heart-warming soup or any way you like.

Who it’s good for:

A frequent circulation of carotenoids in women is good as it keeps breast cancer at bay.

Many studies show a link between lower cholesterol levels with the consumption of carrots.

It’s a great addition in a weight-loss diet as it decreases calorie intake and increases fullness.

There’s an association between carrots and eye health. You can diminish your night blindness with the help of carrots.

Who should stay away:

Carrot may cause pollen-related allergic reactions in certain individuals. [2] If you are hypersensitive to mugwort pollen or birch pollen, you might react to carrots.

Too much carrot is not good for those who have hypothyroidism, as they can’t change the beta-carotene into Vitamin A.

Too much fibre can cause bloating, gas, stomach discomfort and if you don’t drink sufficient water, then constipation. In severe cases, intestinal blockages can even develop. It’s important to increase fibre gradually and drink adequate water.

3. Eggs

Known forever as a heart-healthy source of protein, eggs are an excellent source when you’re looking to fortify your body against the flu. Eggs are loaded with iron and Vitamin A, which helps boost the immune system.

What it does:

One of the most nutritious foods on the planet are eggs. They encompass a bit of virtually every nutrient you need.

Eating eggs is a great way to boost HDL or good cholesterol, which lowers several diseases like stroke, heart disease and more.

One of the best sources of choline is found in eggs. A single egg contains more than 100 mg of choline. It is integral to strengthening the membranes in the brain and helping them keep their structure. [3]

Other than the above, eggs:

  • Are an excellent source of omega-3s
  • Contain antioxidants beneficial for the eyes
  • Help boost nutrient intake for healthy aging
  • Keep muscles strong
  • Help manage weight
  • Make LDL (bad) cholesterol less harmful

Daily recommended dose:

Science shows that up to 3 whole eggs per day are perfectly safe for healthy people.

How to eat:

If you have a craving, no doubt there’s an egg dish out there for you. Eggs are an inexpensive and versatile staple that you can bake, scramble, fry or combine with endless ingredients and you can eat them for breakfast, lunch, dinner or brunch!

Who it’s good for:

This immunity building food is excellent for young kids, pregnant women, and fitness enthusiasts.

A low-carb diet is best for individuals with diabetes. Eggs are rich in animal protein, which enhances bone health and improves muscle mass.

It’s great for those on a weight-loss diet as it increases the feeling of fullness. [4]

Who should stay away:

When eating eggs, individuals who are already at risk of cardiovascular issues may want to be more cautious. Especially if you have a medical or family history of heart disease.

According to a few studies, the consumption of eggs increases the risk of gestational diabetes.

4. Citrus Fruits

Choose your pick from mandarins, limes, grapefruit, gooseberry or lemons. These low-calorie immunity-boosting foods are rich in essential vitamins and minerals.

What it does:

Vitamin C helps fight the common cold and aids in tissue building and repair. Citrus fruits are superb sources of soluble fibres that control cholesterol levels and aid digestion.

Daily recommended dose:

Three to four servings of citrus fruits per day is recommended.

Did You Know?

  • One medium orange contains all the Vitamin C you need in a day!

How to eat:

The most popular way to eat citrus fruits is by themselves. You could also juice them, toss them into a salad, add a few pieces into your water or a dash of lemon in green tea.

Who it’s good for:

Citrus fruits are low calories - a smart choice if you’re watching your calorie intake. They are full of fibre and water that make you full.

Eating citrus fruits may raise citrate levels in urine, which helps lower the risk of kidney stones in a few individuals.

Who should stay away:

The acid in citrus fruits erodes tooth enamel and too much of it stands a chance to increase the risk of cavities.

Citrus fruit juice contains less fibre and more sugar compared to whole fruit. The former may cause weight gain. When your body gets large quantities of fructose or fruit sugar, it turns the extra fructose into fat.

5. Almonds

Just a few almonds a day provides fibre, calcium, unsaturated fat, protein and Vitamin E. The antioxidants help lower the risk of cancer and potentially even Alzheimer’s.

What it does:

Almonds have very many benefits including reducing blood pressure, lowering blood sugar levels, lowering cholesterol levels, promoting weight loss and reducing hunger.

Daily recommended dose:

You can have anywhere up to 28 grams of almonds per day. You can keep a similar grammage for almond butter, oil and paste. Almond milk and flour depends on how you consume it, but going too high isn’t recommended.

How to eat:

You can eat the almonds you get in the market raw, added to salads or to pesto sauce, smoothies, desserts or soak a couple of almonds overnight and consume them before breakfast.

You can also consume almond in the form of almond oil, flour, milk, butter or paste (marzipan).

Note:

Almond milk is ideal for vegans and health-conscious individuals.

Who it’s good for:

Almonds are low in carbs and high in fibre, protein and healthy fats. They help control blood sugar, which makes them perfect for people with diabetes. It’s also found that almonds can lower cholesterol levels.

It’s excellent for individuals who are trying to lose weight, as almonds and other nuts can increase fullness and help you eat fewer calories.

Who should stay away:

Individuals on antibiotics, blood pressure medication and laxatives should consult with a professional before including almonds in their diet.

Those who have any kind of nut allergy should avoid almonds.

Almonds are chunky. So those who have difficulty swallowing, like young children or older individuals, should stay away from these nuts.

6. Button Mushrooms

One of the most popular non-animal sources of Vitamin D, button mushrooms are also a rich source of B vitamins. Selenium content in mushrooms strengthens the immune system by preventing cellular and tissue damage.

What it does:

Add mushrooms to your diet to fight cholesterol, viral infections, and inflammation. Mushrooms also help strengthen your bones, give you energy and maintain your heart health.

Daily recommended dose:

Up to 100 grams of button mushrooms is recommended.

How to eat:

Grill mushrooms in minimum oil for optimum benefits. You can add them to many dishes, salads, sauces or saute them. Just remember, overcooking mushrooms can deplete the nutritional value.

Who it’s good for:

Mushroom is a superfood for diabetics. It not only keeps a check on insulin but also is an excellent source of chromium that’s helpful for blood sugar levels.

Those looking to lose weight can add this low fat and carbohydrate food to their diet.

Who should stay away:

Mushrooms can trigger mold allergies and cause an allergic reaction to some people. Consult a doctor if you notice allergies.

7. Fermented Foods And Beverages

Incorporate immunity building foods into your diet in the form of fermented food and beverages. Fermented foods are rich in Vitamin C, zinc and iron that aids in digestive health.

Note:

There’s a link between gut health and immunity. The better your gut, the better your immunity.

What it does:

The number one benefit of fermented foods and beverages is improved digestion. They help restore the balance of friendly bacteria. [5]

Other positives are mental health, weight loss and heart health.

Daily recommended dose:

With beverages such as yogurt, buttermilk, kombucha, kefir or kvass, a few sips to a half cup is sufficient.

With fermented vegetables and fruits like sauerkraut, a few tablespoons daily are great.

How to eat:

You can drink beverages like kefir, kombucha, or eat curd with your rice everyday. You can also eat foods like cheese, salami, kimchi, sourdough bread and olives.

Who it’s good for:

If you face gut issues like diarrhea, constipation, gas or bloating, fermented foods may help lessen the severity.

If you’re sick, probiotics help you recover faster.

Who should stay away:

Individuals who are sensitive to histamine and other amines may experience headaches, a runny nose, itching, fatigue and other histamine intolerance symptoms after consuming fermented beverages and foods.

8. Broccoli

An excellent source of Vitamin C and antioxidants, broccoli’s nutritional value ranks high among immunity increasing foods. It contains a higher level of proteins than most vegetables and helps in maintaining cardiovascular health.

What it does:

Broccoli reduces cholesterol, strengthens your bones and helps with weight loss.

Daily recommended dose:

Whether raw or cooked, 2 cups of broccoli will help you reap its benefits.

How to eat:

Ideally, lightly steam or stir-fry broccoli. You can also consume them in the raw form, but ensure you wash it thoroughly before use.

Who it’s good for:

Broccoli is shown to reduce inflammation. Eating broccoli may improve diabetic control and lower blood sugar. It also helps reduce constipation and promotes healthy digestion.

Who should stay away:

If you are on blood-thinning medication, talk to your doctor before adding more broccoli to your diet. It’s best for people with hypothyroidism to stay away as broccoli has the potential to interfere with normal thyroid activity.

9. Garlic

Garlic has many immune-boosting benefits. Add chopped or crushed garlic to your meals in moderation.

What it does:

Widely used in traditional medicine, garlic is rich in allicin and sulfur compounds that protect your digestive tract. Garlic has been used to treat the common cold, reduce hypertension and improve cholesterol levels.

Daily recommended dose:

4 grams of raw garlic for adults in a day and 300 mg of the powder is alright. Follow a similar grammage for other forms like paste, oil, etc.

How to eat:

Garlic is delicious and very easy to include in your current diet. You can find whole cloves, powders, garlic oil, garlic extract, paste and supplements. You can add it into sauces, soups, dressing, savoury dishes and more.

Who it’s good for:

Garlic lowers blood pressure, so it’s good for those with hypertension.

Garlic is effective against neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. Plus, it helps the intestines and reduces inflammation.

Who should stay away:

A common effect of garlic is bad breath and body odour. So if you don’t want either of those, stay away from eating raw garlic. Some people may also be allergic to garlic.

10. Chickpeas

Surprised to know legumes are in the list of foods that boost immunity? Chickpeas are rich in protein and fibre and are a healthy choice for children and adults alike.

What it does:

Replace your meat dish with a chickpea salad or soup. It helps in weight loss, diabetes control, cardio health and provides adequate nourishment.

Daily recommended dose:

The serving size for an adult is 1 cup of chickpeas a day.

How to eat:

It’s incredibly easy to make chickpeas a part of your diet. The most popular way is to add them to salads, sandwiches or soups. Indian channa bhatura is also a delicious dish.

Who it’s good for:

It’s great for those trying to lose weight or on a diet as chickpeas contain high fiber and protein, which helps fill you up, lowers your appetite and reduces calorie intake.

It’s an excellent source of protein for individuals who avoid animal products. The fibre content benefits individuals with diabetes. Chickpeas can also prevent iron-deficiency and anemia.

Who should stay away:

Excessive fibre may aggravate the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, gas, acidity, bloating, etc.

Chickpea allergy is common in those who are allergic to hazelnuts, peas, soy, etc. People who take beta-blockers should consume chickpeas in moderate quantities.

11. Bell Peppers

Abundantly rich in Vitamin C and antioxidants, bell peppers are a colorful addition to your diet.

What it does:

Capsaicin found in bell peppers help accelerate metabolism and assist in weight loss. They also contain nutrients such as Vitamin K1, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, folate, and potassium, which help reduce the risk of anemia.

Daily recommended dose:

An optimal intake level would be one cup per day.

How to eat:

Available in multiple colors, bell peppers are versatile and you can use them in stir-fries, roasted, stuffed dishes or simply eat them raw in salads.

Who it’s good for:

Capsicum helps you burn fat and lose weight. So if you are trying to lose weight then you might want to eat capsicum. If you suffer from iron deficiency, consume capsicum. It contains around 300 percent of the daily requirement of Vitamin C.

Who should stay away:

Occasionally some people can be allergic to bell peppers, especially to those who have a pollen allergy.

If you have high blood pressure, eating a large amount of capsicum might cause a spike in your blood pressure.

12. Dark Chocolate

Chocolate aficionados, rejoice! If you’ve dreamed of eating chocolate every day, now you can!

What it does:

Filled with flavonoids and minerals like iron, magnesium and zinc, a daily healthy dose of dark chocolate can improve your immunity. It also reduces stress levels, significantly lowers the risk of heart diseases, and it’s one of the best foods for mental health and wellness.

Daily recommended dose:

You can consume 30 to 60 grams daily. [6]

How to eat:

Eating it straight from the package is the easiest. Other delicious ways are to grate it over your morning oats or add it into baked goods.

Who it’s good for:

Dark chocolate possesses anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce inflammation.

It’s an excellent food for those battling depression. Dark chocolate is good when you’re on a diet, as it has high satiety value and keeps you feeling full for a longer time.

Who should stay away:

The only thing you need to worry about with dark chocolate is that it’s a calorie-dense food. So while you satisfy your sweet tooth, you must consume it in moderation.

SkinKraft Tip:

The darker the chocolate, the greater the health benefits.

13. Salmon

Salmon, a tasty and versatile fatty fish, is one of the most nutritious foods on the planet.

What it does:

With a substantial amount of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins, just two servings a week is sufficient. A pescatarian diet is much healthier than red meat. It boosts brain activity, reduces heart diseases, lowers blood pressure and helps in weight loss.

Daily recommended dose:

Adults eat at least two portions of a total of 250 grams of salmon in a week.

How to eat:

Grill salmon in healthy oils such as olive oil for better taste and nutritional value. You can steam, saute, poach, bake, or grill salmon and add it to rice dishes, pasta, salads, soups, burgers, and more. You can also eat raw salmon in sashimi and sushi.

Who it’s good for:

Excellent for those who want to decrease risk factors for diseases, lower blood pressure and reduce inflammation.

Selenium found in salmon is good for those who want to improve thyroid function and a powerful weapon against inflammation.

Salmon, that is low in calories, can help you lose weight and keep it off.

Who should stay away:

Excessive consumption of fish may result in mercury buildup in your body.

Those who are breastfeeding and pregnant women should limit their consumption of fish.

Individuals with weak immune systems should steer clear from raw salmon.

14. Avocados

A nutrient powerhouse, it contains over 20 nutrients and eases heart diseases, improves vision, and maintains a healthy appetite.

What it does:

A nutrient powerhouse, it contains over 20 nutrients and eases heart diseases, improves vision, and maintains a healthy appetite.

Daily recommended dose:

½ to one avocado a day is reasonable for your intake. Avocados are not calorie-free. So moderation is key to maintaining a healthy weight.

How to eat:

Simply scoop them with a spoon and eat it or toss it into your favorite salad, make guacamole or a rich and creamy smoothie. Avocado toast is the new avocado-mania.

Who it’s good for:

Avocados are beneficial for pregnant women as they contain folate, which helps in foetal development.

With very high levels of potassium, avocados support healthy blood pressure levels.

The fibre content in this fruit benefits metabolic health and weight loss.

Who should stay away:

With too much avocado, over time you can develop oral allergy syndrome. [7]

Weight watchers should stick to one-half to one whole avocado per day.

15. Beetroots

Anyone can fall in love with the beautiful and bright color of beetroots.

What it does:

Filled with Vitamin C and antioxidants, beets promote good gut health. It is low in calories and fat and helps balance blood pressure. The rich fiber content takes care of digestive health and also helps in weight loss.

Daily recommended dose:

The recommended serving is 70 to 140 ml of beetroot juice and 200 grams of a whole beetroot.

How to eat:

You can pickle, steam, roast or juice beets. You can make beetroot dip, sauce or salad too. Beetroots are best enjoyed raw and uncooked.

Who it’s good for:

Recommended for people with inflammation as it contains anti-inflammatory compounds called betalains. [8]

With high iron content, beets are a great source for those with iron deficiency.

Who should stay away:

Individuals with low blood pressure should consult with a physician before adding beetroot to their diet.

The high levels of oxalates can cause kidney stones in people with a high risk of this condition.

If you have irritable bowel syndrome or gastrointestinal issues, beetroot juice may cause stomach upset.

16. Pomegranate

These fruits can be eaten raw every day in order to reap many health benefits.

What it does:

A juicy blend of flavonoids, antioxidants, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and folate, pomegranate helps fight against bacterial infections and inflammations. It also lowers blood pressure and improves cardio health. Herbal tea made with pomegranate can boost immunity and overall well-being.

Daily recommended dose:

You can eat 2 cups of fruit per day.

How to eat:

You can just eat the fruit, make a juice, add it to a salad or even throw them in cocktails - either way, it tastes great!

Who it’s good for:

Those looking to boost their digestive system. Pomegranate's fiber content can help with this.

It’s good for those who want to keep dental plaque at bay because of its antimicrobial properties. [9]

Who should stay away:

Some people may develop allergic reactions. It is best for them to stay away from pomegranates in such a case.

Pomegranate juice may interact with certain medications like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and blood thinners. It’s best to check with your doctor before you eat or drink pomegranate.

17. Turmeric

More than adding a delicious kick to your meal, turmeric has been used since ancient times for its anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

What it does:

Turmeric can ease chest congestions, skin irritations or burns. Curcumin is the active ingredient that gives turmeric its medicinal properties. It’s also known to lower the risk of heart diseases.

Daily recommended dose:

One to three teaspoons every day works well.

How to eat:

Add it to scrambled eggs and frittatas, toss it into stir-fried veggies, use it in soups, blend it into a smoothie and make your favourite rice dish with a dash of turmeric.

Who it’s good for:

An excellent addition for those looking for anything anti-inflammatory as turmeric has powerful anti-inflammatory effects.

You can also see improvements in the symptoms of anxiety, depression and pain. It also helps with osteoarthritis. [10]

Who should stay away:

Turmeric may cause the gallbladder to contract, making the symptoms worse.

As turmeric is high in oxalate, those with kidney stones should be wary when they consume turmeric.

Turmeric may slow the ability of your blood to clot. Other possibilities with turmeric are it may interfere with iron absorption and it may cause blood sugar levels to drop too low.

18. Tomatoes

Tomato is one of the most versatile and widely used fruits. It’s an excellent addition to every cuisine!

What it does:

A brilliant source of Vitamin C, potassium, folate, and Vitamin K, tomatoes help in improving immunity, reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. It also promotes healthy skin and regulates blood pressure.

Daily recommended dose:

1/3 a cup each day is recommended for optimal health.

How to eat:

A few simple ways to include tomatoes in your diet is in a salad, scramble them into eggs, roast them, make fresh tomato sauce, toss them into a smoothie, into a sandwich or on pizza.

Who it’s good for:

Tomatoes are considered to be beneficial for skin health, like protection from sunburn and tan removal during summers.

You can avoid obesity and manage your weight with tomatoes as it’s a low-calorie filling food.

Who should stay away:

If you have digestive stress or have gastroesophageal reflux disease, you shouldn’t consume too much. The malic acid and citric acid content in tomatoes can cause acid reflux or heartburn.

Excessive tomatoes can also lead to a build-up of kidney stones. In general, lycopene is good, but excess consumption can also result in lycopenodermia and discoloration of the skin. Eating too many tomatoes can also give you diarrhoea.

19. Blueberries

These exotic berries have a delicious flavor and taste, and they’ve effortlessly paved their ways to our plates.

What it does:

A powerful source of antioxidants, low in calories and rich in fibre, blueberries are a delightful addition to your immunity-boosting foods. These tiny little berries help fight ageing and cancer. They’re also known to help prevent heart diseases and enhance brain function. [11]

Daily recommended dose:

Grab ½ - 1 cup of this guilt-free berry to snack on any time of the day.

How to eat:

You can enjoy blueberries in a salad, as a topping on waffles and pancakes along with cream, on top of your morning oats, in a smoothie, as a parfait or as is.

Who it’s good for:

Blueberries contain a lot of Vitamin C and Vitamin C helps collagen, which is great for the skin.

Blueberries are free of sodium, so they’re superb for lowering blood pressure.

It's good for those with cholesterol because of the presence of antioxidants.

Who should stay away:

People who are taking blood thinners should limit their consumption of blueberries due to the high content of Vitamin K.

20. Chia Seeds

Considered to be one of the best superfoods, chia seeds pack a significant amount of nutritional value and health benefits.

What it does:

It is naturally free of gluten and helps in weight loss. It is a superb vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. It helps control blood sugar levels and improves immunity.

Daily recommended dose:

It’s safe to consume about 1.5 tablespoons of chia seeds twice a day.

How to eat:

These tiny seeds by itself taste bland. Adding them to other dishes is an excellent idea. Sprinkle some on top of rice dishes, vegetables, yogurt, cereal, smoothies, puddings or porridge.

Who it’s good for:

Due to the high quality and quantity of protein, chia seeds are a weight loss friendly macronutrient shown to aid weight loss.

Most of the carbs in chia seeds are fibre. Fibre feeds on the friendly bacteria in your intestine and helps keep your gut flora well-fed and healthy. This improves digestion and overall stomach health. [12]

Who should stay away:

Those with existing digestive issues should limit their intake of chia seeds. Too much fiber can cause issues for some like gas, bloating, diarrhoea, constipation and abdominal pain. Typically, drinking sufficient water can cut out such issues, but this varies from body to body.

Chia seeds can be risky for those who cannot swallow easily as you may choke. Chia seed allergies are rare, but some people may be allergic.

Chia seeds are known to lower blood sugar and blood pressure. So those who are taking medicines for diabetes or high blood pressure should be careful.

Note:

Always ensure you soak chia seeds for a minimum of 5–10 minutes before you eat them.

Foods That Hurt Your Immune System

Consuming heavily processed foods, refined flour, sugary drinks and junk food causes obesity.

It's best to avoid food and beverages like:

  • Fast food
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Candies
  • Chips
  • Ice creams
  • Aerated beverages
  • Processed foods
  • Refined carbohydrates
  • Foods and drinks high in sugar

Devoid of any nutritional value, junk food weakens the body’s natural immunity. This leads to further complications such as heart diseases and cancer.

What Happens When You Consume Too Much Immunity-Boosting Foods?

Eating too much of any food is not good for you, even if they’re healthy. So, it’s best to mix things up.

The rule is to eat a rainbow-coloured diet in a given week. Every food comes with its own nutritional benefit, so when you mix things up, you are more likely to get what you need.

Plus, you’ll become bored and intolerant to the same food if you consume them repeatedly.

As with other things in life, even with foods that boost immunity, moderation is key.

Wrapping Up

A balanced diet based on your nutritional and calorie requirement can supplement immunity development. Make a conscious effort to include food that boosts immunity in your daily diet.

Consult a dietician or a nutritionist to understand better what diet plan and food are ideal for each individual.

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